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An Evaluation of Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria of the White River Waterways: Water Sampling (Poster 1) Pubblico Deposited

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MLA citation style

Akbar, Samina, et al. An Evaluation of Antibiotic Resistance In Bacteria of the White River Waterways: Water Sampling (poster 1). . 2021. https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/ab31cfa1-563f-49ec-acdb-dfa4d21edec3?locale=it

APA citation style

Akbar, Samina, Medernach, Kevin, Lisek, Nicole, & Ahmad, Azeem. (2021). An Evaluation of Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria of the White River Waterways: Water Sampling (Poster 1). https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/ab31cfa1-563f-49ec-acdb-dfa4d21edec3?locale=it

Chicago citation style

Akbar, Samina, Medernach, Kevin, Lisek, Nicole, and Ahmad, Azeem. An Evaluation of Antibiotic Resistance In Bacteria of the White River Waterways: Water Sampling (poster 1). 2021. https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/ab31cfa1-563f-49ec-acdb-dfa4d21edec3?locale=it

Note: These citations are programmatically generated and may be incomplete.

The dramatic increase in the prevalence of antibiotic resistant (AR) genes in numerous bacterial species has been a heavily discussed topic within the scientific community. Antibiotic resistant bacteria pose a serious threat to an individual’s health and is an ongoing area of research with a variety of public health implications. Antibiotic resistant genes can lead to the development of “super bugs” which can become immune to currently used antibiotics. This leads to much more severe infections, difficulties in properly treating those infections, and can result in long lasting health complications. There are several factors responsible for the development of these “super bugs,” namely over prescription and the spread of medical and agricultural runoff in natural environments. This runoff exposes bacteria to antibiotics and allows them to develop resistance and spread rampantly between non-pathogenic and pathogenic bacteria. Identifying local reservoirs that house these AR bacterial strains has become pertinent. The white river watershed flows through thousands of miles of streams and local drainage areas providing drinking water to residents of central Indiana. The Nina Mason Pulliam Ecolab (NMPE) at Marian University is part of this specific watershed. This Ecolab provides a prime environment in which different bacterial strains can thrive. This provides a crucial medium for the mixing, evolution, and spread of antibiotic resistant genes and bacteria. Gathering and studying water samples from the NMPE will provide insight into the prevalence of multidrug resistance genes. Previous research at MU-COM has found bacteria carrying multiple drug resistance (MDR) in the Nina Mason Pulliam EcoLab (NMPE) watershed. In the summer of 2020, 87.5% of the samples collected exhibited multiple drug resistance.

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