Title

Aesculapius: Adding a Dimension of Instruction Through Integrating Spatial Knowledge

Authors

Document Type

Poster

Publication Date

11-9-2018

Abstract

Objective: A proof-of-concept for a platform designed to provide simulations modeling, in three dimensions, anatomical pathology/dysfunctions(as defined by osteopathic diagnostic criteria). Design/Methods: Data from a two dimensional Computerized Tomography (CT) image stack, uploaded to the Amira software, was analyzed and interpolated (slice-by-slice) to render individual three-dimensional bones and muscles. These data were used to construct educational simulations of kinetic three-dimensional movements—movements that are most often taught to be manifestations of musculoskeletal pathology in osteopathic medical schools in the United States. The movements modeled were: forward and backward rotation of the left innominate, and Fryette motion (Type I and Type II) in the first and second lumbar vertebrae. The rotation of the left innominate was paired with muscular attachments to a static right innominate, femur, and sacrum. The attachments are used as a reference to better demonstrate the etiology of bony dysfunctions caused by muscular hypertonicity in the lower limbs. The narrated simulations were uploaded unto the Sketchfab website as hyperlinks and plotted unto a spatially manipulatable, three dimensional, static, skeletal model of pathology. The plotted points hold information relevant to the pathology at bony landmarks with links to recordings of the techniques used to treat the pathology. The techniques are modeled and explained by medical students at Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine (MUCOM). Results: three dimensional models of dysfunctions that are represented statically, three dimensional models of dysfunctions that are represented kinetically with narration, and human models that describe and portray the techniques used to treat the dysfunction. Conclusions: the proof-of-concept elucidates the merit of utilizing the technology available, to aid in a restructured adjunctive approach to early osteopathic training. modeling, in three dimensions, anatomical pathology/dysfunctions(as defined by osteopathic diagnostic criteria). Design/Methods: Data from a two dimensional Computerized Tomography (CT) image stack, uploaded to the Amira software, was analyzed and interpolated (slice-by-slice) to render individual three-dimensional bones and muscles. These data were used to construct educational simulations of kinetic three-dimensional movements—movements that are most often taught to be manifestations of musculoskeletal pathology in osteopathic medical schools in the United States. The movements modeled were: forward and backward rotation of the left innominate, and Fryette motion (Type I and Type II) in the first and second lumbar vertebrae. The rotation of the left innominate was paired with muscular attachments to a static right innominate, femur, and sacrum. The attachments are used as a reference to better demonstrate the etiology of bony dysfunctions caused by muscular hypertonicity in the lower limbs. The narrated simulations were uploaded unto the Sketchfab website as hyperlinks and plotted unto a spatially manipulatable, three dimensional, static, skeletal model of pathology. The plotted points hold information relevant to the pathology at bony landmarks with links to recordings of the techniques used to treat the pathology. The techniques are modeled and explained by medical students at Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine (MUCOM). Results: three dimensional models of dysfunctions that are represented statically, three dimensional models of dysfunctions that are represented kinetically with narration, and human models that describe and portray the techniques used to treat the dysfunction. Conclusions: the proof-of-concept elucidates the merit of utilizing the technology available, to aid in a restructured adjunctive approach to early osteopathic training.

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