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Malnutrition Screening and Treatment in Pediatric Oncology: A systematic review Pubblico Deposited

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MLA citation style

Bishop, Chris, Franke, Jessica, and Runco, D.V. Malnutrition Screening and Treatment In Pediatric Oncology: A Systematic Review. Research Square. 2021. https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/dc66476b-9e16-4931-a023-927cb6c2a0cf?locale=it

APA citation style

Bishop, Chris, Franke, Jessica, & Runco, D.V. (2021). Malnutrition Screening and Treatment in Pediatric Oncology: A systematic review. https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/dc66476b-9e16-4931-a023-927cb6c2a0cf?locale=it

Chicago citation style

Bishop, Chris, Franke, Jessica, and Runco, D.V.. Malnutrition Screening and Treatment In Pediatric Oncology: A Systematic Review. Research Square. 2021. https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/dc66476b-9e16-4931-a023-927cb6c2a0cf?locale=it

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Purpose: Malnutrition and cachexia during pediatric cancer treatment worsen toxicity and quality-of-life. Clinical practice varies with lack of standard malnutrition definition and nutrition interventions. This systematic review highlights available malnutrition screening and intervention data in childhood cancer and the need for standardizing assessment and treatment. Methods: Ovid Medline, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library were searched for studies containing malnutrition as the primary outcome with anthropometric, radiographic, or biochemical measurements. Secondary outcomes included validated nutritional assessment or screening tools. Two authors reviewed full manuscripts for inclusion. Narrative analysis was chosen over statistical analysis due to study heterogeneity. Results: The search yielded 234 articles and 17 articles identified from external sources. Nine met inclusion criteria with six nutritional intervention studies (examining appetite stimulants, nutrition supplementation, and proactive feeding tubes) and three nutritional screening studies (algorithms or nutrition support teams) each with variable measures and outcomes. Both laboratory evaluations (albumin, prealbumin, total protein) and body measurement (weight loss, mid-upper arm circumference) were used. Studies demonstrated improved weight, without difference between formula or appetite stimulant used. Screening studies yielded mixed results on preventing weight loss, weight gain, and survival. Conclusion: Our review demonstrated a paucity of evidence for malnutrition screening and intervention in pediatric cancer treatment. While a variety of malnutrition outcomes, interventions, and screening tools exist, nutritional interventions increased weight and decreased complications. Screening tools decreased malnutrition risk and may improve weight gain. Potential age- and disease-specific nutritional benefits and toxicities also exist, further highlighting the benefit of standardizing malnutrition definitions, screening, and interventions. This is a preprint submission.

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  • BMC Nutrition (under review)
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