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Diet of the Myotis Sodalis (Indiana Bat) at an Urban/Rural Interface Public Deposited

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MLA citation style

Tuttle, Nicole M, Sparks, Dale W, and Benson, David P. Diet of the Myotis Sodalis (indiana Bat) At an Urban/rural Interface. Eagle Hill Institute. 2006. https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/d90a6ace-79e8-4dd1-b5cc-49d2c6728376?locale=en

APA citation style

Tuttle, Nicole M, Sparks, Dale W, & Benson, David P. (2006). Diet of the Myotis Sodalis (Indiana Bat) at an Urban/Rural Interface. https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/d90a6ace-79e8-4dd1-b5cc-49d2c6728376?locale=en

Chicago citation style

Tuttle, Nicole M., Sparks, Dale W., and Benson, David P.. Diet of the Myotis Sodalis (indiana Bat) At an Urban/rural Interface. Eagle Hill Institute. 2006. https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/d90a6ace-79e8-4dd1-b5cc-49d2c6728376?locale=en

Note: These citations are programmatically generated and may be incomplete.

We conducted a study of the diet of the federally endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) at an urban/rural interface near Indianapolis International Airport in summer 2004. We used two 1-m2quadrats covered with window screening to collect guano under a known roost tree. We then examined 20 fecal pellets/week until the bats abandoned the roost (i.e., 13 weeks). The most common orders of insects eaten were: Lepidoptera (35.3% volume, 84.6% frequency), Diptera (27.9%, 73.2%), Coleoptera (16.9%, 62.9%), and Hymenoptera (10.9%, 45.9%). Components of the diet at the ordinal level varied significantly over time. Despite the developed nature of the site, the diet consisted of the same components reported in earlier studies.

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  • Northeastern Naturalist (Vol.13, Iss.3)
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