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A Retrospective Chart Review Comparing Ultrasound Guided Verses Landmark Intravenous Access Public Deposited

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MLA citation style

Ertel, David R. . A Retrospective Chart Review Comparing Ultrasound Guided Verses Landmark Intravenous Access. Fox, Tara.. 2021. https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/a74fcca6-3757-4b02-81bc-47e13c5389b4?locale=en

APA citation style

Ertel, David R. (2021). A Retrospective Chart Review Comparing Ultrasound Guided Verses Landmark Intravenous Access. https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/a74fcca6-3757-4b02-81bc-47e13c5389b4?locale=en

Chicago citation style

Ertel, David R. . A Retrospective Chart Review Comparing Ultrasound Guided Verses Landmark Intravenous Access. 2021. https://mushare.marian.edu/concern/generic_works/a74fcca6-3757-4b02-81bc-47e13c5389b4?locale=en

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In 1984, Ultrasound-Guided (USG) Intravenous (IV) access was first used to place central venous catheters (CVC) in real-time. This led to increased success rates, reduced procedural times, decreased site associated complications, and a standard of care. As USG technology and teaching methods for CVC placement have improved, studies suggest this technique could also be translated into peripheral intravenous (PIV) placement. A retrospective chart review was conducted at an emergency department within a large healthcare facility to determine the reliability of USG PIVs when compared to landmark PIVs. The principal investigator reviewed the charts of adult inpatients admitted into the hospital from the Emergency Department (ED) comparing those who acquired landmark IV verses USG IV access to assess overall reliability. The data included IV survival rates, success rates, and site complications. 30 landmark and 17 USG PIVs were reviewed. Among the landmark PIVS, survival rates and success rates could not be measured. No site complications for landmark PIVs could be found. Among the USG PIVs, survival rates of only three could be found out of 17. No success rates could be measured. Only four site complications or reasons for PIV discontinuation could be found, including two counts of occlusion, one expiration, and one catheter damaged. In conclusion, due to limitations and lack of data found in this review, significance between variables could not be determined.

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