Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-30-2006

Published In / Presented At

Northeastern Naturalist (Vol.13, Iss.3)

Abstract

We conducted a study of the diet of the federally endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) at an urban/rural interface near Indianapolis International Airport in summer 2004. We used two 1-m2quadrats covered with window screening to collect guano under a known roost tree. We then examined 20 fecal pellets/week until the bats abandoned the roost (i.e., 13 weeks). The most common orders of insects eaten were: Lepidoptera (35.3% volume, 84.6% frequency), Diptera (27.9%, 73.2%), Coleoptera (16.9%, 62.9%), and Hymenoptera (10.9%, 45.9%). Components of the diet at the ordinal level varied significantly over time. Despite the developed nature of the site, the diet consisted of the same components reported in earlier studies.

Rights

© 2006 Eagle Hill Institute

Comments

This is an Open Access article, with the published version at the following URL:

http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1656/1092-6194%282006%2913%5B435%3ADOTMSI%5D2.0.CO%3B2

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1656/1092-6194(2006)13[435:DOTMSI]2.0.CO;2

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